#

Dream, Believe & Liberate: Round #1

19:30 - 20:30

Boekhandel Dominicanen

Dominicanen dreams the night away.

It doesn't matter what time you enter Dominicanen: expect to be transported to another world! Every hour, six different performances - based on six different literary texts - will enrich every square meter of this heavenly location in an extraordinary way.

From children's books and legendary speeches to literary novels and stories from the future that are yet to be created. From dance and music to sound sculptures and theatre. Every 6 minutes a different past, present and future takes the spotlight. Walk in and believe, dream and feel liberated!

6 texts x 6 performances x 6 minutes
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide

1.I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat…
An artistic performance based on the world famous speech of Winston Churchill. Let yourself be carried away to 1940, imagine yourself in 'The house of commons' and listen to Churchill's legendary words...

Concept & Production: Jelle Stiphout (Artistic director at Het Verbond) / Performance: Sander van Egmond

2.What would you do when you are alone in the world? 
What kind of clothes do you wear? What would you do? Do you feel liberated or do you hold hope for a fellow companion? A dance performance based on the world famous children's book 'Alone in the world' by Hector Malot.

Choreography: Jennifer Romen (part of Dance Lab affiliated with SALLY Dansgezelschap Maastricht) Dancers: Noëla Habets, Mickéla Peters, Eva Janssen, Zara Ahmed & Stella Donners.  ​​​​​​​

3.The Sky is always purple
A performance with an emphasis on hope, freedom and possibilities… Based on the book by literary talent Sholeh Rezazadeh.

Voice: Mine Stemkens / Reader: Em Sadler

4.The Chiefs of Lebak
This composition by Joep van Leeuwen – as is often the case in his music – is somewhere between jazz and composed music. For Museumnacht Maastricht he was asked to create music based on the famous text “Hoofden van Lebak” by Multatuli. After a polyphonic beginning in which cello and trombone prepare the main melody, the jazz guitar is added into the mix while improvising, after which the vocals start declaiming the original text. As the guitar, trombone and cello further develop the main melody, the text takes on a new dimension. After a number of spoken sentences, the trombone improvises in jazz style and reinforces the spoken words. The most poetic sentence of the text – Why Asks the Tree ..... – is eventually sung as a short song. The piece ends with a passage in which the singer pronounces random words from the text, thus creating a sort of summary. The cello finally closes the piece powerfully in a way that questions this piece of Dutch history.

Composition: Joep van Leeuwen / Performers: Hanne Vansant jazz vocals, Tim Daemen jazz trombone, Stephan Hendrix cello and Joep van Leeuwen jazz guitar. 

5.My little dream 
The performance ‘My little dream' is based on a poem. When I dream, I am able to dream about anything. When I wake up, it's quietly strange....​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

Concept, installation and direction: Monique van Kerkhof
Artistic assistant: Bo Oudendijk / Vocals: Monique van Kerkhof Performers: Bo Oudendijk & Elizabeth Akimana & Nie Oudendijk

6.Text from the future 
In the beginning was the word. An evolving sound sculpture in Ukrainian, Russian, Dutch, Latin and a spectrum of other languages. The multi-premiere in the context of 'Believing, dreaming and liberating' will take place during Museumnacht Maastricht. More on “In the Beginning Was the Word”: Traditionally, churches were enhancers of the word of God. The sound sculpture “In the Beginning Was the Word” gives this a bio-futuristic interpretation. The continuous birth of the divine in and through the word becomes an integral part of architecture. All languages ​​go back to the mystical beginnings in which humanity and linguistics arose apart. The promise of peace, deliverance, and reconciliation dwells in all tongues.

Concept and makers: Govert Derix, Paul Caron, Rutger Muller